The NSA built its own search engine, for the US government to search your private communications
You remember the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA): introduced in 2011 but failed to pass the Senate, then reintroduced in 2013 only to be beaten back a second time. This go-around, Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Saxby Chambliss (R.-Ga.) have stripped out the mention of “protection” and rechristened their draft bill the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act.
(via Infowars)

You remember the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA): introduced in 2011 but failed to pass the Senate, then reintroduced in 2013 only to be beaten back a second time. This go-around, Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Saxby Chambliss (R.-Ga.) have stripped out the mention of “protection” and rechristened their draft bill the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act.

(via Infowars)

Don’t let the U.S. government hand over your private data to corporations!

Don’t let the U.S. government hand over your private data to corporations!


The United States Congress is putting internet users privacy at risk. Again.
Congress is about to vote on the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) which makes it easier for private companies to share sensitive personal information with federal agencies. That’s troubling enough. But CISA lacks any privacy or human rights protections — and it specifically fails to protect the private data of internet users outside the United States. CISA also allows federal agencies to use data it collects in Espionage Act investigations — a move that could silence whistleblowers who seek to expose the truth about illegal government programs.While President Obama has openly called for a civilian agency to lead U.S. cybersecurity efforts, CISA would allow for the automatic transfer of our sensitive information from private companies straight to U.S. intelligence agencies. And get this: Corporations that participate in these programs would get full immunity from any legal challenges.Tell President Obama to take a stand against this bill, which attacks our basic human rights, and to promise to veto CISA if it crosses his desk.

The United States Congress is putting internet users privacy at risk. Again.

Congress is about to vote on the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) which makes it easier for private companies to share sensitive personal information with federal agencies. That’s troubling enough.

But CISA lacks any privacy or human rights protections — and it specifically fails to protect the private data of internet users outside the United States. CISA also allows federal agencies to use data it collects in Espionage Act investigations — a move that could silence whistleblowers who seek to expose the truth about illegal government programs.

While President Obama has openly called for a civilian agency to lead U.S. cybersecurity efforts, CISA would allow for the automatic transfer of our sensitive information from private companies straight to U.S. intelligence agencies. And get this: Corporations that participate in these programs would get full immunity from any legal challenges.

Tell President Obama to take a stand against this bill, which attacks our basic human rights, and to promise to veto CISA if it crosses his desk.

Interview with Asim Ghafoor, one of the 5 Muslim American leaders targeted by the NSA. 

It has actually become a global trend.

It has actually become a global trend.

Let’s kick off the World Cup by giving surveillance a red card:

Let’s kick off the World Cup by giving surveillance a red card: